The Open Register

Members of the Open Lab Initiative who have opted for an Open Register match can browse the Open Register below to select their own matches for joint group meetings.

Research groups have been assigned a register number and are listed anonymously in the register to ensure that matches are made based on a group's research interests and expertise as opposed to their reputation.

 

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The Open Register

Register number Research group summary Is looking for... Graphical representation
11 Research themes:
  • Biomarkers
  • Biotherapeutics
  • Cancer metabolism
  • Cell and molecular biology
  • Liver cancer
  • Pancreatic cancer
  • Surgery
Like minded research groups.  
13 The XXX lab at the XXX Institute develops technologies for doctors to make better decisions faster. Leveraging theory, computation and experiments, we are creating novel measurement and prediction systems for integrated cancer biology. We work in translational projects on three frontiers: (1) Revealing the mutational processes acting on cancer genomes, measuring their impact on patient phenotypes, and using them for personalised therapy decisions; (2) Improved patient stratification, early detection, and prognosis by predictive modelling of tumour imaging and genomics data; (3) Predicting strategies to overcome resistance and reduce toxicity by comparative network analysis of transcriptional responses to combinatorial CRISPR perturbations in single cells.

Research themes:

  • Bioengineering
  • Breast cancer
  • Computational biology and big data
  • Early detection and diagnosis
  • Evolution
  • Genetics
  • Genomics
  • Imaging
  • Oesophageal cancers
  • Ovarian and gynaecological cancers
  • Precision medicine
  • Tumour microenvironment
If one of the points in our research summary strikes a note for you - talk to us!  
15 We work as computational support for XXX. Our interests range from general bioinformatic tools, benchmarking to general cancer biology.

Research themes:

  • Biomarkers
  • Genetics
  • Genomics
I am looking for bioinformaticians to discuss our research methods, workflows and new bioinformatic tools.  
16 Our group is interested in developing and validating radionuclide based methods for the purpose of imaging or delivering radiation to cancer. A number of cancer specific markers have been successfully targeted for these types of approaches yet many more have not been explored and may be relevant in specific cancer types. We have expertise and facilities for clinical and preclinical imaging with radionuclide based methods.

Research themes:

  • Biomarkers
  • Drug discovery and clinical trials
  • Imaging
  • Precision medicine
  • Radiobiology and radio-oncology
Groups that work on specific molecular targets which are relevant to cancer which may be targeted for the purpose of radionuclide imaging and/or radionuclide therapy. Groups with expertise and knowhow to design, screen and synthesize small molecules for the purpose of binding known cancer specific targets, with the aim of radiolabeling for imaging or therapy.  
17 XXX’s research is focussed on understanding the role of altered metabolism in cancer, particularly investigating how small molecule metabolites affect the process of tumorigenesis. The major goal of XXX team is to exploit this knowledge to pioneer novel tools for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

Research themes:

  • Cancer metabolism
  • Cell and molecular biology
  • Computational biology and big data
  • Urological cancers
New partners for our research endeavours.  
18 My research interests focus on mechanisms of disease initiation and maintenance and the identification and validation of novel therapeutic targets in myeloid leukaemias. Specifically I study the role of adaptive responses to current therapies, including novel targeted therapies, in several subtypes of myeloid leukaemias and at leukaemic stem cell level, with a specific focus on the role of metabolic adaptations, as a mechanism of resistance not driven by genetic mutations.

Research themes:

  • Blood cancers
  • Cancer metabolism
  • Cell and molecular biology
  • Stem cells and the cancer niche
Somebody with similar interests and expertise but also wider expertise we can tap into. So groups working on both blood and solid cancers with interests in therapy resistance and adaptive changes of tumours to external stresses via epigenetic and metabolism. Also a group with a bigger expertise in genomics, biomarkers and diagnostic might help us broaden our expertise.  
19 We are a recently established group working on developing mouse models of paediatric brain tumours called high-grade gliomas (pHGGs). The majority of these tumours carry mutations in the histone variant H3.3, thought to be the initiating event in the development of this cancer. However, this mutation is not sufficient to drive tumourigenesis alone— additional co-segregating partner mutations are needed to drive tumour initiation. These co-segregating mutations are found at varying frequencies in tumours and are used to define distinct tumour subtypes. However, the roles these additional mutations play in tumour development and stromal/immune co-option are not well understood. Our lab is analysing the effects of these additional co-segregating mutations in mouse models, using single cell sequencing and mass cytometry approaches. We will also use these immune-competent models of different tumour subtypes for CRISPR screening and drug development, to identify subtype-specific vulnerabilities in this heterogeneous disease.

Research themes:

  • Brain tumours
  • Cell and molecular biology
  • Genomics
  • Immuno-oncology
  • Paediatric cancers
  • Radiobiology and radio-oncology
  • Stem cells and the cancer niche
  • Tumour microenvironment
We are interested in collaborating with labs with expertise in:
  1. Single cell RNA sequencing
  2. The tumour microenvironment
  3. Genetic heterogeneity in cancer
  4. CRISPR screening and analysis
  5. Clinically focused labs with expertise in brain tumours
 Group 19
20 My interests lie in understanding the process of cancer initiation and the role epigenetic reprogramming plays in this. We are interested in the relationship between reprogramming, tissue regeneration and genomic instability. Longer term the interest is in chemical prevention of cancer to reduce the burden in the ageing population. We are using in vitro embryonic stem cell reprogramming systems to explore these molecular events and have also been focusing on aberrant cancer associated DNA methylation changes and the mechanisms that drives this in stem cells.

Research themes:

  • Cancer prevention
  • Cell and molecular biology
  • Genomics
  • Stem cells and the cancer niche
  • Epigenetics
We would like to connect with labs that have similar scientific interests and expertise in any of the following areas:
  • in vivo mouse models and/or adult human stem cell biology and stem cell niche where cancer arises from,
  • human adult stem cell modelling systems such as organoids and how they can be used to study cancer initiation,
  • computational expertise and experience in statistical modeling and analysis of large-scale, multi-dimensional genomic/epigenomic data,
  • genomic and chromosome instability.
 
22 We have redefined breast cancer as a constellation of 10/11 genomic driver-based subtypes. This new molecular taxonomy of breast cancer will now be translated into the clinic in stratification, tumour monitoring and therapy studies. In parallel we will continue to develop human explant models to characterize the biology of these subtypes using co-clinical trials and perturbation screens.

Research themes:

  • Biomarkers
  • Biotherapeutics
  • Breast cancer
  • Computational biology and big data
  • Drug discovery and clinical trials
  • Evolution
  • Genetics
  • Genomics
  • Immuno-oncology
  • Precision medicine
  • Tumour microenvironment
Expertise in adaptive trial designs. Expertise in in vivo CRISPR screens.  
23 Biopolymer-based nanomaterials for drug delivery (with emphasis on pancreatic cancer) and DNA vaccine design. Artificial enzyme design, in particular flavin-inspired structures. Surface biofunctionalisation using mild click chemistry including photo-click strategies to enable cell uptake and organelle targetting. Photonic crystal-based biosensors.

Research themes:

  • Bioengineering
  • Early detection and diagnosis
  • Pancreatic cancer
  • Radiobiology and radio-oncology
  • Drug nano carriers
  • DNA vaccine design
Finding new biological targets for drug delivery/sensing. 3D models for nanomaterial studies: diffiusion over biological barriers, better understanding of the rational design (effects of charge, size, mechanical properties), application of flavin species in biological systems in particular as adjuvants in vaccines or antioxidants.  Group 23
24 My lab investigates the mechanisms through which long noncoding RNAs regulate genome stability and their relevance to cancer. Our research is highly interdisciplinary and combines functional cell biology, genomics, imaging (live-cell imaging and microscopy) and proteomics.

Research themes:

  • Cell and molecular biology
  • Genomics
  • Imaging
  • RNA biology
We are interested in groups which have experience in RNA, cancer and computational biology.  
25 Our research programme leverages two decades of advancements in magnetic resonance imaging and assocaited methodologies to accrue the evidence to inform the difficult discussions with patients with brain tumours, and their families, on the balance between extending life and preserving cognition; a very personal decison.

Although conventional MRI is a fundamental clinical tool for brain tumour diagnosis and monitoring, the spatially extended topography of brain networks sub-serving cognition makes predicting functional impairments challenging. We have previously shown that focal brain tumours produce long-range gradients in function, and consequently that their effects require interpretation in terms of changes in functional network architecture. We have also discovered that the spatial distribution of brain tumours is largely explained by brain regions that are the connections between networks that are highly metabolically active, express genes for metabolic processes, cell division and gliomagenesis, and are co-located with progenitor cells, and that increasing space occupancy of tumours exerts a detrimental effect on memory following treatment by its perturbation of the associated functional network. Together, this evidence leads us to believe that the type and severity of tumour- and treatment-induced cognitive deficits is dependent on which network, and specifically which components of the network, interact with the tumour.

Research themes:

  • Brain tumours
  • Imaging
  • Precision medicine
  • Surgery
We would be interested in meeting groups with interests in brain tumour interactions - from cells to systems - with the surrounding tissue, and how molecular markers, grades and other characteristics modify these interactions. We are also keen to meet with others looking at imaging methods for tumour diagnosis and prognosis, assessing heterogeneity, and therapeutic options, as well as groups looking at cognitive sequelae of tumours and their treatment.  
27 Bioengineer specialising in: Bioreactor design, co-culture, 3D in vitro tissue growth, Mechanotransduction, electrical stimulus to cells / tissues, developing CT imaging techniques for soft / dynamically loaded / live tissue samples, biomedical material development, characterisation and testing.

Research themes:

  • Bioengineering
  • Early detection and diagnosis
  • Imaging
  • Lung cancer
  • Stem cells and the cancer niche
Oncology researchers interested in using bioengineering techniques in 2D / 3D in vitro culture and/or new imaging techniques to develop new biomarkers for early detection.  
29 We have expertise in mapping changes in the chromatin landscape of cancer cells during disease progression and relating these changes to transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming. By conducting network analyses we are identifying intervention points within these data types that can restrict the evolution of cancer and the acquisition of treatment resistance. Primarily we are focussing on hormone-dependent cancers.

Research themes:

  • Biomarkers
  • Cancer metabolism
  • Cancer prevention
  • Cell and molecular biology
  • Early detection and diagnosis
  • Genetics
  • Genomics
  • Urological cancers
We are hoping to match up with groups with an interest in deconvoluting large datasets to infer regulatory relationships between metabolic changes and epigenetic alterations or between DNA repair pathways and inflammation. We believe that teasing apart co-dependent vulnerabilities between these, and other biological processes, is fundamental to durable treatment responses and enhanced early cancer detection. Researchers with a particular in modelling these co-dependencies in a pre-clinical setting would also be ideal matches.  
33 My group is focusing on theranostics and image guided drug delivery for precision medicine. The team synthesises novel chemical entities that help tracking (imaging) the drug and the lesions (primary and metastases). These new drug carriers respond to a physical trigger remotely applied to release the drug fast and at high dose only in the tumour. The team develops the novel molecules in vitro and the image guided drug delivery in vivo in tumour models. The imaging is based on Near Infra-red and MR and the physical triggers are temperature and focused ultrasound (cavitation included). The team also develops a novel image guided treatment modality based on microwaves and novel materials for tumour “scan and treat”. These techniques can be applied for breast, brain, pancreas cancers. This technique can also use endoscopic imaging (capsule) and our developed theranostics for colorectal cancer.

Research themes:

  • Bioengineering
  • Biotherapeutics
  • Brain tumours
  • Breast cancer
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Early detection and diagnosis
  • Imaging
  • Precision medicine
We are looking for partners i) to collaborate on combination of this image guided therapy with immunotherapies such as STING agonists ii) to collaborate on providing precise and fast delivery of novel anticancer agents that require acting in tumours (avoid systemic exposure). For instance for novel drug agents with poor tumour availability and/or high systemic toxicity iii) radiologists and x-ray therapy experts to test these as radiosensitizers (they contain Gd and we can introduce Iridium; or other high-z metals + drugs) iv) we are looking to collaborate with scientists that have transgenic mice of colorectal cancer and /or pancreatic cancer v) we are looking to collaborate with oncology researchers to investigate the effects of either ultrasound or MW/RF on the tumour microenvironment.vi) also we are looking for collaboration for RNA therapeutics to be delivered with purpose made chemistry and image guided methods. Group 33
35 We are interested in the development of computational tools to characterize the patterns of mutations and genome instability processes in human cancers through the analysis of genome sequencing data from clinical samples and preclinical models. Our research areas include the discovery of biomarkers of drug response, inference of the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer evolution, early detection of cancer, and the identification of the somatic alterations predictive of response and resistance to immunotherapies. We are also interested in the application of artificial intelligence to model drug response using genomically characterized preclinical models to uncover new vulnerabilities of cancer.

Research themes:

  • Early detection and diagnosis
  • Genetics
  • Genomics
  • Immuno-oncology
  • Precision medicine
We are a computational group focused on the development of algorithms for sequencing data analysis. We'd be happy to explore collaborations where this expertise would be valuable to other groups.  
36 We are interested in rationally identifying small molecules and peptides against several anti cancer targets. We use various in silico screening approaches to find lead/drug like hits. In recent time, we are engaged in finding multi-target hitting agents.

Research themes:

  • Drug discovery and clinical trials
We are looking for a) medicinal chemists b) structural biologists and c) oncology researchers to collaborate.  
38 Tackling metastasis and treatment failure are two of the biggest challenges in cancer research. We are carrying out studies of the cellular environment around a tumour, investigating the genetic and molecular changes that enable cancer cells to break away and start moving towards new sites. We use cutting-edge microscopy techniques to watch tumours growing and spreading in real time inside a living organism. We are growing cancer cells together with normal cells from patients and use computer modelling to understand the complex molecular dialogue between different cells within a tumour.

Research themes:

  • Biophysics
  • Breast cancer
  • Cancer metabolism
  • Cell and molecular biology
  • Head and neck cancers
  • Imaging
  • Melanoma
  • Tumour microenvironment
Compatible ideas and complementary expertise.  
39 We focus on high throughput immunohistochemical screening and characterisation of molecules involved in various cellular pathways in order to identify novel diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic markers. This has allowed identification of novel diagnostic markers for haematological malignancies (and solid tumours), and it served as an enabling methodology for basic translational research cutting across various research themes and landing to collaborations within academia and industry, locally, nationally and internationally.

The second arm of our research activity is to develop microscope-based assays such as the recently established multiplex immunolabelling (MIL) technique that can be applied on diagnostic FFPE and fluid samples to characterise in depth the phenotype of tumour cells as well as to analyse the tumour microenvironment.

Research themes:

  • Biomarkers
  • Biotherapeutics
  • Blood cancers
  • Cancer metabolism
  • Drug discovery and clinical trials
  • Imaging
  • Immuno-oncology
  • Precision medicine
  • Stem cells and the cancer niche
  • Tumour microenvironment
  • Immunohistochemical screening
  • Microscope-based assays
We would like to integrate our expertise in any study that requires antibodies analyses, validation, characterization and application of multiplex labeling techniques including RNAscope and image analysis.  
40 We are interested in how changes in the retinoblastoma tumour suppressor (RB1) pathway in cancers affect cancer cell behaviours, including response to therapies (radiation, small-molecule targeted and conventional).

We actively work on the response of cancer cells to CDK4/6 inhibitors, and on the synthetic lethality opportunities that arise due to RB1 pathway perturbance.

Research themes:

  • Biomarkers
  • Breast cancer
  • Cancer prevention
  • Cell and molecular biology
  • Paediatric cancers
  • Radiobiology and radio-oncology
  • Tumour microenvironment
We would be interested in linking with teams undertaking breast cancer research where CDK4/6 inhibitors are entering the clinic, teams working in cancer with high prevalence RB1 loss, such as small cell lung, osteosarcoma, teams with interest in cell cycle biology/ systems biology.  
41 Our research focus is the development of imaging and computational techniques to better understand and quantify the tumour microenvironment. In particular, we have developed methods using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to noninvasively quantify physiological, structural and functional properties (e.g: cell size, blood flow, tissue oxygenation, tissue stiffness, pH and glucose uptake) and use them to help understand the delivery of anticancer drugs into tumours. These data are combined with data from three-dimensional microscopy from ex-vivo samples (such as lightsheet and HREM), alongside computational modelling, to provide a detailed description of pathological mechanisms and to simulate drug delivery.

Research themes:

  • Biomarkers
  • Cancer metabolism
  • Computational biology and big data
  • Early detection and diagnosis
  • Imaging
  • Tumour microenvironment
Groups that are interested in our expertise to study new therapies, to characterize preclinical models or find new imaging biomarkers.  
42 We are a molecular imaging research group with extensive experience in developing and improving methods for tracking molecules and cells both in vitro and in living subjects. The main imaging modalities we use are nuclear imaging technologies (PET and SPECT) and optical imaging methods. Our expertise lies mainly in the synthesis and/or modification of molecular imaging probes for labelling with radioisotopes and using these radio-labelled probes to interrogate specific biological functions in cancer cells in vitro and in animal models. We also have a growing interest and expertise in radiobiology and the use of molecules labelled with therapeutic radioisotopes to specifically target cancer cells (molecular radiotherapy).

Research themes:

  • Cell and molecular biology
  • Imaging
  • Precision medicine
  • Radiobiology and radio-oncology
  • Tumour microenvironment
Our imaging expertise can be applied to virtually all aspects of cancer research. We are looking to establish collaborations with cancer research groups that would like to harness the opportunities imaging can provide to help answer important research questions that are difficult to answer otherwise. Group 42

 

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