Ovarian Cancer

Advanced ovarian cancer is difficult to cure. Most patients are free of the disease after completing initial surgery and chemotherapy but the cancer usually comes back. This is because resistance to chemotherapy develops. Scientists are studying the genetic changes that occur in tumours to understand what causes cancer cells to become resistant to drugs. They are also using new imaging technology so they can monitor how tumours are responding to treatment and whether they have spread to other parts of the body.

Cambridge research in ovarian cancer

Programme Contacts

University of Cambridge
Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute

Selected publications

New biomarkers for response

Studies in high grade serous ovarian cancer, using circulating tumour cell DNA (ctDNA) and tissue samples from patients that have relapsed, are providing information regarding common pathways that might be associated with resistance. Analysis of circulating tumour cell DNA (ctDNA) may provide a rapid and sensitive indicator of response and tumour change during treatment. Studies of plasma samples, alongside clinical data from a large number of patients, are being examined to see if there is a positive correlation of particular mutations with response or treatment resistance.

Identification of susceptibility loci for ovarian cancer

Genome wide associated studies (GWAS) are being used to identify genetic susceptibility loci for ovarian cancer. Pooled data from studies in North America and the UK have identified four loci wtih another two suggestive. Additional evidence for functional mechanisms underlying susceptibility is also being investigated in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer.

Understanding drug resistance

Paclitaxel is widely used to treat ovarian cancer but only about half of patients benefit from it due to drug resistance. The mechanisms of resistance are being studied by collecting and analysing tumour samples, both before and after treatment. This information is being used to help develop novel therapeutic approaches to identify whether patients will respond to paclitaxel before they start treatment.

Principal investigators and consultants

  • All members
  • Group leaders
  • Clinical consultants
University of Cambridge
Department of Public Health and Primary Care
Strangeways Research Laboratory
My research interests involve the development and application of statistical modelling techniques to the inherited susceptibility of cancer...
PI:
N
CC:
N
Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Department of Surgery
.
PI:
N
CC:
Y
University of Cambridge
Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute
CRUK Cambridge Institute
Cancer Services, Cambridge University Hospitals
Ovarian cancer has a disproportionately high health care burden because of low cure rates and frequent symptoms caused by recurrent bulky...
PI:
Y
CC:
Y
University of Cambridge
Department of Oncology
My cancer related research is focused on the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression from endometriosis to clear cell ovarian...
PI:
Y
CC:
N
Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Department of Haematology
Human papilloma virus infection and development of disease Response to therapy in ovarian and cervical cancer Surgical technique Comorbidity
PI:
N
CC:
Y
University of Cambridge
Department of Oncology
My main area of work is the development of a software pipeline for the automated analysis and variant calling from Next Generation...
PI:
N
CC:
N
University of Cambridge
Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute
Ovarian cancer
PI:
N
CC:
N
University of Cambridge
Department of Oncology
Strangeways Research Laboratory
My current research focusses on understanding the role of genetic variants played in breast cancer prognosis and side effects of...
PI:
N
CC:
N
University of Cambridge
Department of Public Health and Primary Care
My primary affiliation within the Cancer Research United Kingdom Cambridge Centre is with the ovarian cancer research programme. I...
PI:
N
CC:
N
University of Cambridge
Department of Public Health and Primary Care
Centre for Cancer Genetic Epidemiology
Genetic association studies in order to identify common genetic variants that modify breast and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2...
PI:
N
CC:
N
University of Cambridge
Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute
I am a Research Associate (postdoc) in the Brenton and Markowetz labs at Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, University of Cambridge...
PI:
N
CC:
N
University of Cambridge
Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute
We develop computational approaches for the systems genetics of cancer. To identify drivers of cancer we link genetic data to molecular and...
PI:
Y
CC:
N
Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Department of Histopathology
.
PI:
N
CC:
Y
University of Cambridge
Department of Public Health and Primary Care
Strangeways Research Laboratory
I am interested in the architecture of genetic susceptibility to common cancers (primarily breast, ovarian and colorectal). I am also...
PI:
Y
CC:
Y
University of Cambridge
Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute
I'm a molecular biologist focus on translational research in high grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). I work on identification of genomic...
PI:
N
CC:
N
Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Department of Gynaecological Oncology
Main research activites have been in prevention of gynaecological cancers and specifically cervical cancer. We have international...
PI:
N
CC:
Y
University of Cambridge
Department of Oncology
I am working on genetic susceptibility to the risk of ovarian cancer and clinical outcome after a diagnosis of ovarian cancer. I have led...
PI:
N
CC:
N
Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Department of Oncology
.
PI:
N
CC:
Y
Investigation of genetic risk factors of ovarian cancer and am involved in OCAC (Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium). Development of...
PI:
N
CC:
N
CMDL Oncology Manager
PI:
N
CC:
N
I am interested in developing new models of high grade serous ovarian cancer that will aid to decipher the mechanisms of chemoresistance.
PI:
N
CC:
N