Professor Tony Green

University of Cambridge

University departments
Department of Haematology
University institutes
Cambridge Institute for Medical Research
Wellcome Trust MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute

Position: Head of Department
Personal home page: https://www.stemcells.cam.ac.uk/people/pi/green
Email:   arg1000@cam.ac.uk

PubMed journal articles - click here

Research description

Tony Green is Professor of Haemato-oncology in the University of Cambridge and honorary Consultant Haematologist at Addenbrookes Hospital. He was appointed Head of the University Department of Haematology (2000-2020), and in 2016 was appointed Director of the Wellcome-MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute. In work which has spanned basic, translational and clinical research he has explored the transcriptional control of normal blood stem cells and more recently the mechanisms by which blood stem cells are subverted to cause haematological malignancies.

He has held multiple academic, clinical and educational leadership roles, both nationally and internationally, has been appointed to visiting professorships at several universities, was elected Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences (2001) and President of the European Haematology Association (2015-2017), and was awarded the Jean Bernard award (2020) by the European Haematology Association and the Donald Metcalf award by the International Society of Experimental Hematology (2021).

Research
The JAK/STAT pathway has essential roles in several aspects of metazoan biology including haematopoiesis and stem cell function. Somatic mutations affecting this pathway occur in multiple tumour types and are especially common in human myeloproliferative neoplasms. The Green lab is studying the molecular and cellular mechanisms whereby aberrant JAK/STAT signalling subverts haematopoiesis and results in a myeloproliferative neoplasm

Research Programme
Haematological Malignancies
arg1000
Recent publications:
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